grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.

A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)

Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?

I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.

Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”

Norm

matttaylordraws:

The multi-talented Timba Smits has taken the art directing reigns of movie mag Little White Lies this month, and he invited me to draw this portrait of James McAvoy to accompany an interview with the actor, soon to star in Irvine Welsh adaptation Filth.
Not much to say other than that this was really fun to draw, and thanks for Timba for getting me involved. The issue should be on shelves in all reputable and disreputable stockists now.

matttaylordraws:

The multi-talented Timba Smits has taken the art directing reigns of movie mag Little White Lies this month, and he invited me to draw this portrait of James McAvoy to accompany an interview with the actor, soon to star in Irvine Welsh adaptation Filth.

Not much to say other than that this was really fun to draw, and thanks for Timba for getting me involved. The issue should be on shelves in all reputable and disreputable stockists now.

mikuloctopus:

I just wanted to take a second to show what a couple years time can do. I wanted to show that improvement is a constant climb. I don’t believe art is something you’re born with, or gifted with. It takes time, dedication, passion and sacrifice. It’s not something to get discouraged over. If you are not happy with where you are, good!! That means you see the flaws. You know what to work on, and if you don’t, you’ll search until you figure it out. Don’t ever stop drawing, don’t ever stop asking questions, don’t ever stop experimenting. Sorry for the soap box but I truly believe everyone has the potential to be as great as the want to be. It just takes time. :)

mikuloctopus:

I just wanted to take a second to show what a couple years time can do. I wanted to show that improvement is a constant climb. I don’t believe art is something you’re born with, or gifted with. It takes time, dedication, passion and sacrifice. It’s not something to get discouraged over. If you are not happy with where you are, good!! That means you see the flaws. You know what to work on, and if you don’t, you’ll search until you figure it out. Don’t ever stop drawing, don’t ever stop asking questions, don’t ever stop experimenting. Sorry for the soap box but I truly believe everyone has the potential to be as great as the want to be. It just takes time. :)